Shmir Me (CD)

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Shmir Me (CD)

15.00

This debut album by the Wholesale Klezmer Band is a perfect introduction to their work - not only to their sound and style, but also to the group's view of the relevance of traditional Yiddish culture and values to contemporary life. The recording is a mix of dance music, including a wedding medley; new tunes (both vocal and instrumental) in the traditional style; a love song, and a couple of prayers. But the bulk of the vocal numbers on this recording are drawn from the Jewish labor and social justice movements. The members of Wholesale believe that these traditions represent a strong, vital connection between them and those who came before. Sometimes poignant, sometimes funny, these songs reach from the past into today, grabbing our attention and telling us that there is still work to be done to make the world a kind and just place for everyone.

Contents:

  • Freylekhs Nokh Der Khupe (a Dance At The Wedding Canopy)
  • Shmir Me By Yosl Kurland
  • Di Lebedike Eltste (the Lively Old Folks) music by Sherry Mayrent
  • Der Strayker ( The Striker)

Medley:

  • Fayerdike Libe (Fiery Love)
  • Kale Bazetsn (Music For Seating Of The Bride)
  • Khosidl (dance)
  • Freylekhs (dance)
  • Mamalige
  • Yismakh Moyshe/Yismekhu
  • Mit Fuftsik Yor Tsurik (Fifty Years Ago) music by Sherry Mayrent
  • Arbetlozer Marsh (March Of The Unemployed)
  • Wholesale Hora
  • Bessarabian Honga

 

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If you’re already a klezmer music fan, this is an essential addition to your collection. If you are a newer fan, like myself, here is a great introduction to a rich, deep, and yes, at times very humorous tradition.
— Lahri Bond
Review of Shmir Me in Dirty Linen, April-May 1993
One listen [to Shmir Me] and a quick review of band members’ biographies and there is no question about the group’s wealth of talent and serious commitment to the preservation of traditional Yiddish culture.
— Review of Shmir Me
Springfield, MA Jewish Weekly News, July 29, 1993